The 5 Is of creating engaging experiences

Engaging people in a concept or idea is hard, engaging them with work is even more so. The simple fact is that work in general is difficult, not necessarily because it is challenging but because it feels like something you don’t want to do. If it was something you wanted to do why do you need to get paid to do it? Whilst this is often the case, it isn’t always true, there are many people who love their jobs and the work they do and as a result they are engaged with that work and committed to achieving success.

I am sure everyone knows the famous story of President John F Kennedy visiting NASA, meeting a cleaner and asking him what his job was to which the cleaner supposedly replied “I help put men on the moon”. Regardless of whether this is factual or not, this is a great example of someone understanding the greater purpose of their job. It is entirely possible that another cleaner working in the same building having been asked the same question would have replied with “I keep the floors clean”. If I were the sort of person to gamble I would put money on the first cleaner doing a better job than the second.

The clear distinction between these two cleaners is a strong sense of purpose, the first cleaner understands why he is doing his job where as the second cleaner only understands what he needs to do and how he needs to do it. Simon Sinek talks about this in a recent TED talk on how create leaders inspire, which you can find here.

Now we understand the difference, how do you go about sharing the why so that people connect and engage with it? The model below was created with several of my colleagues to help us understand how to create such an experience…

IDENTIFY – a metaphor or story that helps you share your message as this will help people relate their personal and emotional experiences with the work you are trying to engage them with. It is important to consider the ramifications of using particularly emotional metaphors as the outcome can sometimes be extreme.

INFORM – explain work and the metaphor you are using and how it connects to the work that the participants are or will be doing. This needs to focus on why they are doing the work not what they are doing or how they need to do it. It is worth noting that not everyone will immediately and consciously understand why the metaphor is appropriate so it is essential that this connection be brought to attention at some point.

ILLUSTRATE – exemplify the metaphor by using one or more stories to show how the metaphor connects with the work. This enables the participants to start connecting with the topic, this can be done in a number of ways and doesn’t need to be someone verbally sharing stories. These stories are the emotional hook that will connect participants to the work so it is important to choose carefully.

INVOLVE – allow the participants to explore the metaphor and make it their own, provide content that enables them to start connecting on a deeper level with the story and the metaphor. Providing information on the metaphor will help on this front, whether that be through the use of reading materials or multimedia stories. There is a quote I would like to bring attention to here

Tell me and I will forget, show me and I may remember, involve me and I will understand

IMMERSE – turn the participants into actors within the metaphor, make them a part of the story by immersing them in the action. The small things matter here, attention to detail enables the participants to enter the metaphor without thinking about it. This can be achieved in a number of ways and works particularly well when the participants have experience of the metaphor before as they fill in the blanks that you weren’t able to create.

As an  example of this I was involved in an event some time ago where we were trying to engage our participants with the importance of quality. To do this we identified the airline industry as a good metaphor for the session given the impact of quality on safety. We didn’t want to just inform the participants that quality is important so we set about creating an experience.

We used an emergency landing story to base our experience on given the potential emotional connection people might have with plane crashes. Upon arrival our participants were given aeroplane tickets and boarding passes and asked to check their luggage, and were sent to a waiting room complete with screens displaying current flights. When it was time to start the participants were ushered to board the plane where their tickets were taken and they were sat down in aisles complete with safety cards and air. Sound was used to signify take off and a comical breaking noise was used to signify something had gone wrong followed by the words ‘BRACE’ ‘BRACE’ being spoken over a microphone system.

The whole experience was concluded with a news report sharing the cause of the emergency landing being an overlooked micro crack in the wing. This helped pull the whole thing together and bring it back to the original intent, quality is crucial not just to a company’s success but also to the service provided and avoiding the potential consequences that may result.

I have recently seen a video on alternate reality gaming which you can find here which has caused me to rethink the level of engagement you can create using multimedia and game mechanics. I would love to hear about any stories you may have of experiences you have helped create or participated in.

Model created in collaboration with several members of the Telford ASE

5 Principles for Great Visual Facilitation

Graphic facilitation is the use of visual media and imagery to guide a group of individuals to achieve a common goal. The imagery will be used differently by each individual in the group but overall the effect will be one of improved alignment in a similar way to meeting minutes. The greatest power of images over words is in the interpretation, after all…

A picture tells a thousand words

I have found that this form of facilitation is most powerful when used during conversations that have no predetermined end point apart from an alignment of the individuals present. This is because the images themselves become a structure for what had been discussed already and suggest potential topics for continuing the conversation.

I have been facilitating using graphics for several years note and over that time I have discovered five principles that have helped me.

The 5 Principles of Graphic Facilitation

The 5 Principles of Graphic Facilitation

1. Prepare for the conversation
It can often help to learn more about the topic before the conversation where possible as this can provide useful insight. This research can be done in a number of ways including reading relevant material or taking with the participants before hand. This isn’t always essential from a capture perspective but will help you to engage with the conversation and improve the end result.

2. Understand where the emotion is
Emotion is the critical component to creating a visual that facilitates a conversation. It is important to understand the topics that are creating the emotion in the conversation as these are the ones that need most guidance.

3. Create a foundation using keywords
Listen carefully to the conversation and keep your ear open for key points of debate. This is often easier when you know the topic being discussed but if you don’t the group can be used for guidance, consider their response as points are raised. you need to distil the essence of a message into a word or a short statement. These keywords help you to construct a map of the conversation that you can create imagery around.

Writing is an important part of any graphic facilitators tool kit and as such it is essential to practice your style. Remember it should be readable and quick as well as look good so think about it from another perspective.

4. Organise your work
Group common topics together, consider how they connect with each other. The important thing here is to ensure that relationships are clearly illustrated. This can be done through the use of boxes, clouds, arrows, lines and even scale. Depending on your medium it can be hard to rearrange so think about your layout before you start, considering where you want to leave room and what you want to be focused on is critical at all stages.

5. You don’t have to be Picasso…
To use graphic facilitation does not require you to be an amazing artist or illustrator. I’m not saying that the end product won’t look amazing if you are, I’m saying that to share its meaning a picture doesn’t have to be a work of art. Any imagery can be simplified down to icons using basic shapes such as circles, triangles and rectangles. Use these to construct icons that represent the pictures you are thinking of when you hear the keywords.

Do you have any advice you’d like to share?