Embedding Employability in an Academy – A Case Study

Recently as a member of the Telford ASE I was involved in the designing and facilitating of a Personal Development Day for Abraham Darby Academy. Capgemini, the company I work for, partners with the academy as part of Business In The Community (BITC) and are invovled in a number of projects to help build a stronger community. The ASE were brought in to help tackle a particular challenge that is quite close to the hearts of many teachers and young people in education today.

How can the academy better prepare young people for life at work?

I wanted to share the thinking that went into the session, if you’re interested in seeing how it ran feel free to view the video summarising the day on the Capgemini YouTube Channel here

The first thing i want to make very clear is that this session was all about enabling the academy and its teaching staff to better itself, to grow on what it already did and do more. There were a number of questions that needed to be answered in the session in order to break this challenge down…

  1. Why does it matter that young people are prepared for work?
  2. What does ‘prepared for work’ really mean?
  3. What can we as a group impact and change?
  4. How do we go about making these changes happen?

Before we began though we wanted to break down faculty barriers and we wanted people to remember why they got into teaching in the first place. We wanted them to remember what their first job was like, how scary it was and start thinking about what would have helped them. To do this we created pretend camp fires for small groups to share stories, we created an environment that they felt free to talk and discuss and meet new people they hadnt worked with before.

Why does it matter that young people are prepared for work?

This might seem obvious but when you put this into the context of a community, a school, a teacher or even a pupil it becomes less obvious as school life is based around results and results are curriculum, academic and subject focussed. This makes it hard to incorporate other elements into an already busy school day and certainly distracts from other goals. Whilst academics and the curriculum have a significant impact on a young persons readiness for the work place there are a multitude of other things that also have critical roles.

To help the teachers see through this typical lens we asked the teachers and the pupils to complete a survey in the lead up to the session asking them questions about the state of employability skills in the academy. These questions enabled us to share with the teachers a current state view that was coming from themselves and their pupils as opposed to an outside influence or statistics that didnt necesarily apply to them. We followed this up with a clip from youtube called ‘A pep talk for teachers and pupils’ created by Kid President, we wanted to ensure the teachers understood the importance of the work they do and the importance for teachers to inspire and enable pupils to achieve. The video asks some great questions including…

What are you teaching the world?

Look for the awesome. Teachers see things, they see when you run behind the hall, they see when you’re passing notes, but they also see the person that we can all become someday; a writer or a speaker or Martin Luther King.

It’s time to be more awesome

We wanted the teachers to have intent to make a difference in their day to day working lives and help pupils be more prepared.

What does ‘prepared for work’ really mean?

Again this seems like a simple question but when you overlay different careers and university and everything else it comes muddied and complicated. We wanted to make it simple and enable the teachers to determine what it meant for themselves and enable them to create a shared view of this same point. To enable this we provided the teachers with a lot of different collateral including…

  • online research into employability skills
  • information on the compentencies that companies like Capgemini look for
  • asessment processes including putting them through a phone interview and group exercises
  • a number of their ex-pupils who now work for Capgemini

This part of the day wasn’t about educating the teachers explicitly, it was about providing them with an array of information they could engage with and allow them to start thinking more about what young people need from their education.

What can we as a group impact and change?

The challenge with this question is that most people naturally work with what they know and in the context they are used to as this is much easier, what we needed to do was put them in a new context. The context we operate in has a significant impact on the way we operate, it can change our perceptions, limit our thinking and drive a culture. We wanted the teachers to think big, we wanted them to break out of previous perceptions of what is and what is not possible.

To achieve this we set the scene of a better future, a future where the pupils of the academy are leaving as impressive people who are prepared for what lies beyond. We asked the teachers to tell us more about what this future might look like and specifically how it differs from the present. To ensure they took ownership of these changes we invited small groups to pitch their ideas to the rest of the teaching staff.

We used MG Taylor’s vantage points model (I have spoken about this model before on a previous blog) to help us to create a range of questions that helped the teachers to put detail into their vision of the future. This ensured that the participant group will think about the possibilities holistically. Given the nature of education and teaching we gave sustainability a focus for the conversation to ensure that whatever changes were suggested they were maintainable.

How do we go about making these changes happen?

Given pitched ideas this is the moment of truth, the moment the ideas start to become reality, the moment you can tell if an idea has landed. The big questions here are around how the idea will work and what needs to be done to ensure it happens. The challenge for most people is one of understanding how they will manage this new work on top of what feels like a full work load already. By this point in the event, the momentum had built and it can sometimes feel like anything is possible so practical considerations can be overlooked. It was important for us to ensure the teachers considered the implications of each idea cross faculties with people who are most keen to drive the idea forward and then work it through in faculty groups to understand who will do what and when.

We wanted to make a social difference and based on the feedback we received we achieved this. I hope that you have found this informative, if you have any questions, comments or thoughts feel free to share

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